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Social Media Blocks

Two new social media blocks are introduced in Composer 8.1.450.04 to handle Twitter and Facebook social media interactions and support easier integration with Conversation Manager. Using the new Twitter and Facebook blocks, an organization's Twitter and Facebook handles can be monitored through pre-defined events and messages filtered based on keywords to determine the next action.

In addition, users can also connect via the Facebook Messenger. The message is stored in the Contact History to determine further action based on the day and time the message is received.

Configuring Social Media Accounts

For information on configuring social media accounts, see the eServices Social Media Solutions Guide, Setting Up Social Engagement.

Twitter and Facebook Use Case

  1. The user searches on Twitter or Facebook for the company’s handles and tweets or posts a message, which could be related to an issue being faced or a query targeted to customer care.
  2. The application monitors the Twitter and Facebook handles through pre-defined events and filter messages based on keywords to determine the next action.
  3. The application verifies if the corresponding contact already exists in the Contact History. The user is identified in the Contact History by their Facebook or Twitter handle (if available).
  4. If the user does not exist (that is, social handles are not associated with a registered user), the application creates a user in the Universal Contact Database based on available data. Any further messages and agent replies are stored under this user.
  5. The application then verifies if the day is a normal operational day. If not, a special day message is sent stating that the user’s query will be answered once the service is back online. The special day message is sent as a public message or a private message.
  6. The application has the ability to determine if the operating hours of the service match the current time and day – if not, a standard message is sent in response stating that the query will be answered once the service is back online. This message is sent as a public message or a private message.
  7. In addition, it is possible to define an emergency message that will be sent either as a public message or a private message, if the emergency process is activated.
  8. If within operating hours on a regular day, the application searches for an available agent with the correct skills.
    1. If an agent is available, the interaction is routed to an agent.
    2. If no agent is available, the interaction is queued until an agent becomes available.
  9. The interaction is sent to the agent for an appropriate response.
  10. The agent decides if the interaction requires private comments.
    1. If no private answer is required, the agent replies via the company’s Facebook page or Twitter handle.
    2. If private messaging is required, the interaction is moved out of the public comment space and managed via private messaging (Twitter DM or FB Messenger).
    3. Tip
      Best practice for the agent is to respond to a public message with a public response, indicating that the conversation might be moved to private messaging, if required at a later stage.
    4. The agent also has the ability to simply retweet or like the user comment, or create favorite, if it is considered as general positive feedback and no specific answer or further action is required.
  11. When the interaction is completed, the agent sets a disposition code to register the outcome for reporting purposes.
  12. In addition, the following strategies can also be implemented:
    1. When a tweet or Facebook post mentioning the organization is posted, an automatic reply to the tweet or Facebook post is triggered. If there is an error in posting the reply, the routing application retries posting the reply for a predefined duration.
    2. When a direct message is sent to the organization's Twitter handle, the interaction is routed to a specific agent group.
    3. When a positive tweet or Facebook post about the organization is posted, the routing application automatically retweets or likes the message.

Facebook Messenger Use Case

  1. The user sends a message via the Facebook Messenger, to the company (for example, after having been asked by an agent to connect privately).
  2. The message is stored with the customer contact in Contact History.
  3. The application then verifies if the day is a normal operational day. If not, a special day message is sent stating that the user’s query will be answered once the service is back online. The special day message is sent via Facebook Messenger.
  4. The application has the ability to determine if the operating hours of the service match the current time and day – if not, a standard message is sent in response stating that the query will be answered once the service is back online. This message is sent via Facebook Messenger.
  5. In addition, it is possible to define an emergency message that will be sent via Facebook Messenger, if the emergency process is activated.
  6. If within operating hours on a regular day, the application searches for an available agent with the correct skills.
    1. If an agent is available, the interaction is routed to an agent.
    2. If no agent is available, the interaction is queued until an agent becomes available.
  7. The interaction is sent to the agent for an appropriate response.
  8. A Facebook chat session is established between the user and the agent.
  9. When the interaction is completed, the agent sets a disposition code to register the outcome for reporting purposes.

Sample Business Processes

For sample business processes, see the eServices Social Media Solutions Guide, Sample Business Processes for Social Media.

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This page was last modified on November 22, 2017, at 05:48.