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Switches

A Switch is an aggregate of telephony resources within a Switching Office.

Most enterprise-level configurations have a one-to-one match between the Switches and the Switching Offices. However, there may be instances when it is desirable to partition the office into more than one Switch or to create a more efficient and secure numbering plan. In that case, you must define a Switch within a Switching Office.

In the event of the loss of all components at a single site, a Disaster Recovery (DR) strategy is required to ensure that there is a minimal disruption in service. The central part of this strategy is the existence of synchronized switches located at separate sites, and configured with identical sets of Agent extensions and Agent Logins. An agent can log in to either switch at any time.

The Disaster Recovery strategy implemented by Genesys for Genesys components applies to Switches of type SIP Switch. To configure Disaster Recovery for Genesys components, at least one Switch must exist in the Configuration Database.

For additional information about Disaster Recovery, refer to the SIP Server High-Availability Deployment Guide or the Genesys Administrator 8.1 Help.

Display Options

The Switches list shows the Switches that are in your environment. It is sorted in a hierarchy by Tenants, configuration units, sites, and folders. To view objects by a particular hierarchy, select the hierarchy type in the drop-down menu above the list.

Important
Switches that are disabled will appear grayed out in the list.

Configuration Manager respects tenancy permission settings. You can access only those objects that you have been granted permissions and privileges to access.

You can filter the contents of this list in two ways:

  • Type the name or partial name of an object in the Quick Filter field.
  • Click the magnifying glass button to open the Tenant Directory filter panel. In this panel, click the Tenant that you want to select. Use the Quick Filter field in this panel to filter the Tenant list.

You can sort the items in the list by clicking a column head. Clicking a column head a second time reverses the sort order.

To select or de-select multiple objects at once, click the Select button.

Possible Procedures from this Panel

To create a new Switch object, click the New button. To view or edit details of an existing object, click on the name of the object, or click the check box beside an object and click the Edit button.

To delete one or more objects, click the check box beside the object(s) in the list and click the Delete button. You can also delete individual objects by clicking on the object and then clicking the Delete button.

Otherwise, click the More button to perform the following tasks:

  • Clone—Copy a Switch.
  • Move To—Move a Switch to another hierarchical structure.
  • Enable or disable Switches.
  • Create a folder, configuration unit, or site. See Object Hierarchy for more information.

Click on the name of a Switch to view additional information about the object. You can also set options and permissions, and view dependencies.

Creating Switch Objects

To create a Switch object, perform the following actions:

  1. Go to Configuration > System > Configuration Manager.
  2. Click Switches. The Switches list displays.
  3. Click the New button.
  4. Enter the following information. For some fields, you can either enter the name of a value or click the Browse button to select a value from a list:
    • Name—The name of the Switch. You must specify a value for this property, and that value must be unique within this Tenant (in a multi-tenant environment).
    • Switching Office—The Switching Office to which this Switch belongs. You must specify a value for this property. Once you set the value, you cannot change it.
    • Switch Type—The type of Switching Office to which this Switch belongs. This value is set automatically.
    • T-Server—The T-Server Application object through which the telephony objects of this Switch are controlled. Once you establish the association, it cannot be broken as long as the specified T-Server has at least one client application.
    • DN Range—The internal numbering plan of the Switch. Use a hyphen to specify a range of numbers, and use commas to specify a series of stand-alone numbers or ranges—for example, 1100-1179, 1190-1195, 1199. Although this parameter is optional, it may be important for T-Server operation with certain types of Switches.
    • Tenant—In a multi-Tenant environment, the Tenant to which this object belongs. This value is automatically set to the Tenant that was specified in the Tenant Directory field in the object list.
    • State Enabled—If selected, indicates that the object is in regular operating condition and can be used without any restrictions.
  5. The Access Codes tab displays a list of Access Codes that are used to place, route, or transfer calls from this Switch to other Switches in a multi-site installation. Depending on the structure of a numbering plan, you may or may not need access codes to reach DNs that belong to different Switches of a multi-site telephone network. Click the Add button to add an Access Code to this Switch.
  6. Enter the following information in the pop-up window that displays on your screen:
    • Switch—The Switch to which you assign this Access Code.
    • Code—The prefix used to reach DNs of the Switch specified in the Switch property when placing or transferring calls from DNs of the Switch to the object for which you are configuring. You must specify a value for this property. You must specify an Access Code in full accordance with the numbering plan of the contact center telephone network, and you must make any changes to the Access Codes only after the corresponding changes have been made to the telephone network.
    • Target Type—The type of target within the Switch for which you are specifying all routing parameters.
    • Important
      The combination of values for the first three properties—Switch, Code, and Target Type—defines the uniqueness of the Switch Access Codes. You may specify multiple Access Codes with the same code to the same Switch, provided that they have different target types.
    • Route Type—The type of routing for the target specified in the Target Type for this Switch.
    • DN Source—An informational source that specifies the origination point in routing instructions.
    • Destination Source—An informational source that specifies the destination in routing instructions.
    • Location Source—An informational source that specifies the location in routing instructions.
    • DNIS Source—An informational source that specifies the DNIS in routing instructions.
    • Reason Source—An informational source that specifies the reasons in routing instructions.
    • Extension Source—An informational source that specifies the extensions in routing instructions.
    • Click the OK button.
  7. Click the Apply button to save the information in the tab.
  8. The Default Access Codes tab displays a list of Access Codes that can be used by default to place, route, or transfer calls to this Switch from any other Switches in a multi-site installation. Depending on the structure of a numbering plan, you may or may not need access codes to reach DNs that belong to different Switches of a multi-site telephone network. Click the Add button to add a Default Access Code to this switch.
  9. Enter the following information in the pop-up window that displays on your screen:
    • Code—The prefix used to reach DNs of the Switch specified in the Switch property when placing or transferring calls from DNs of the Switch to the object for which you are configuring. You must specify a value for this property. You must specify an Access Code in full accordance with the numbering plan of the contact center telephone network, and you must make any changes to the Access Codes only after the corresponding changes have been made to the telephone network.
    • Target Type—The type of target within the Switch for which you are specifying all routing parameters.
    • Important
      The combination of values for the first three properties—Switch, Code, and Target Type—defines the uniqueness of the Switch Access Codes. You may specify multiple Access Codes with the same code to the same Switch, provided that they have different target types.
    • Route Type—The type of routing for the target specified in the Target Type for this Switch.
    • DN Source—An informational source that specifies the origination point in routing instructions.
    • Destination Source—An informational source that specifies the destination in routing instructions.
    • Location Source—An informational source that specifies the location in routing instructions.
    • DNIS Source—An informational source that specifies the DNIS in routing instructions.
    • Reason Source—An informational source that specifies the reasons in routing instructions.
    • Extension Source—An informational source that specifies the extensions in routing instructions.
    • Click the OK button.
  10. Click the Save button.
Important
Switch Access Codes are codes used by other Switches. Default Access Codes are codes used by this Switch.
This page was last modified on December 13, 2013, at 08:35.

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