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Feature Server Cassandra Maintenance

The nodetool is a Cassandra utility for managing a Cassandra cluster. Use it for Feature Server Cassandra Maintenance.

Regular maintenance repairs inconsistencies across all data ranges, and ensures that replicated data is consistent across all nodes. You should perform maintenance on a node after a Feature Server upgrade and after new Feature Server nodes were added to the cluster. Apply additional maintenance steps after you remove a node from the cluster. See Performing maintenance after removing a node from the cluster for more details.

Important
The following Feature Server Cassandra Maintenance procedures are applicable only in the embedded Cassandra deployment. For information about the External Cassandra maintenance tasks, refer to the Cassandra documentation.

Performing regular maintenance

Run the nodetool command repair on all Feature Server hosts in a Cassandra cluster. See Running Nodetool on a Feature Server Host and Running nodetool repair on all Feature Server hosts in a Cassandra cluster for details about running nodetool and nodetool repair, respectively.

Important
All Feature Server hosts must be up and running to run repair. Running repair increases memory use and may not succeed if the Java heap space max limit is reached. For information on the Java heap size, see Hardware and software prerequisites.


As a best practice, schedule the regular maintenance weekly during the maintenance window (low usage hours), for example, by using Cron on Linux or as a Task Scheduler on Windows.


If you are planning for an ad hoc repair, then start the repair from the Feature Server instances that are configured as alternatevoicexml.

Running nodetool on a Feature Server host

The Nodetool utility has a command line interface. The steps below describe how to run nodetool commands on Cassandra when it is deployed on a host, as part of a Feature Server deployment.

1. Change the current directory.

In the Linux shell terminal:
cd Feature Server Installation Directory/work/jetty-vms_host-http_port-fs.war-_fs-any-/webapp/WEB-INF/lib

In the Windows command prompt window:
cd Feature Server Installation Directory\work\jetty-vms_host-http_port-fs.war-_fs-any-\webapp\WEB-INF\lib

where...
Feature Server Installation Directory is where Feature Server is installed in that host.
vms_host is the IP address of the vms host parameter that Feature Server started with, defined in launcher.xml or in the command line. The default is 0.0.0.0.
http_port is the port number that Feature Server started with, defined in launcher.xml. The default is 8080.

2. Run the Nodetool utility.

On Linux

Note that .jar is separated by the colon ":" punctuation mark.

java -cp libthrift-0.7.0.jar:cassandra-thrift-Cassandra version.jar:commons-cli-1.1.jar:cassandra-all-Cassandra version.jar org.apache.cassandra.tools.NodeCmd -h Cassandra host -p jmx_port nodetool command

On Windows

Note that .jar is separated by the semicolon ";" punctuation mark.

java -cp libthrift-0.7.0.jar;cassandra-thrift-Cassandra version.jar;commons-cli-1.1.jar;cassandra-all-Cassandra version.jar org.apache.cassandra.tools.NodeCmd -h Cassandra host -p jmx_port nodetool command

where...
Cassandra version could be either 1.1.6 or 1.1.12 depending on Feature Server version installed. Please check the actual cassandra-all-*.jar file name in current directory.
Cassandra host is the hostname or IP address where Feature Server is running.
jmx_port is the JMX port number that Feature Server started with, defined in launcher.xml. Default=9192.
nodetool command can be ring [keyspace name] or removetoken <token> or repair or flush.

For example, the following command line runs nodetool and sends the command ring to the Feature Server running on the local host:

java -cp libthrift-0.7.0.jar:cassandra-thrift-1.1.12.jar:commons-cli-1.1.jar:cassandra-all-1.1.12.jar org.apache.cassandra.tools.NodeCmd -h localhost -p 9192 ring sipfs

Running Nodetool with Cassandra JMX Authentication

If Cassandra JMX authentication is enabled, then the nodetool command requires JMX username and password as command line arguments:

On Linux

Note that .jar is separated by the colon ":" punctuation mark.

java -cp libthrift-0.7.0.jar:cassandra-thrift-Cassandra version.jar:commons-cli-1.1.jar:cassandra-all-Cassandra version.jar org.apache.cassandra.tools.NodeCmd -h Cassandra host -p jmx_port -u username -pw password nodetool command

On Windows

Note that .jar is separated by the semicolon ";" punctuation mark.

java -cp libthrift-0.7.0.jar;cassandra-thrift-Cassandra version.jar;commons-cli-1.1.jar;cassandra-all-Cassandra version.jar org.apache.cassandra.tools.NodeCmd -h Cassandra host -p jmx_port -u username -pw password nodetool command

Running Nodetool with Secured Cassandra JMX

If Cassandra JMX port is secured using SSL/TLS, then use the following command to run the nodetool commands such as ring or repair:

Important
This command is supported in Feature Server release 8.1.202.04 and later.

On Linux

Note that .jar is separated by the colon ":" punctuation mark.

java -Dssl.enable=true -Dcom.sun.management.jmxremote.ssl.need.client.auth=true -Dcom.sun.management.jmxremote.ssl=true -Dcom.sun.management.jmxremote.registry.ssl=true -Djavax.net.ssl.keyStore=<keyStore_file> -Djavax.net.ssl.keyStorePassword=<keyStore_password_file> -Djavax.net.ssl.trustStore=<cert_store_file> -Djavax.net.ssl.trustStorePassword=<cert_store_password_file> -cp  libthrift-0.7.0.jar:cassandra-thrift-1.1.12.jar:commons-cli-1.1.jar:cassandra-all-1.1.12.jar:fs-nodetool-utility-fs-9-SNAPSHOT.jar com.genesyslab.nodetool.utility.NodeCmdCustom -h Cassandra host -p jmx_port nodetool command 

On Windows

Note that .jar is separated by the semicolon ";" punctuation mark.

java -Dssl.enable=true -Dcom.sun.management.jmxremote.ssl.need.client.auth=true -Dcom.sun.management.jmxremote.ssl=true -Dcom.sun.management.jmxremote.registry.ssl=true -Djavax.net.ssl.keyStore=<keyStore_file> -Djavax.net.ssl.keyStorePassword=<keyStore_password_file> -Djavax.net.ssl.trustStore=<cert_store_file> -Djavax.net.ssl.trustStorePassword=<cert_store_password_file> -cp  libthrift-0.7.0.jar;cassandra-thrift-1.1.12.jar;commons-cli-1.1.jar;cassandra-all-1.1.12.jar;fs-nodetool-utility-fs-9-SNAPSHOT.jar  com.genesyslab.nodetool.utility.NodeCmdCustom -h Cassandra host -p jmx_port nodetool command


Running nodetool repair on all Feature Server hosts in a Cassandra cluster

On Linux

cd genesys/fs/work/jetty-0.0.0.0-8080-fs.war-_fs-any-/webapp/WEB-INF/lib
java -cp libthrift-0.7.0.jar:cassandra-thrift-1.1.12.jar:commons-cli-1.1.jar:cassandra-all-1.1.12.jar org.apache.cassandra.tools.NodeCmd -h localhost -p 9192 repair -pr


On Windows

cd genesys\fs\work\jetty-0.0.0.0-8080-fs.war-_fs-any-\webapp\WEB-INF\lib
java -cp libthrift-0.7.0.jar;cassandra-thrift-1.1.12.jar;commons-cli-1.1.jar;cassandra-all-1.1.12.jar org.apache.cassandra.tools.NodeCmd -h localhost -p 9192 repair -pr

Performing maintenance after removing a node from the cluster

When you remove a node from the ring, you must also remove the corresponding tokens. Use these software procedures:

  1. Run nodetool ring to obtain tokens. (See Running Nodetool on a Feature Server Host)
  2. Run nodetool removetoken to remove nodes from the ring.
    Note: Only nodes that are down can be removed.
  3. Run nodetool ring to validate removal.
  4. Run nodetool repair on all Feature Server hosts in the cluster.
  5. Run nodetool ring to validate repair.

For example, run nodetool ring to obtain tokens of nodes to be removed:

java -cp libthrift-0.7.0.jar:cassandra-thrift-1.1.12.jar:commons-cli-1.1.jar:cassandra-all-1.1.12.jar org.apache.cassandra.tools.NodeCmd -h localhost -p 9192 ring sipfs

…to see the following output returned tokens of nodes which are down:

<fs-host-IP1> DC1 RAC1 Up Normal 1.17 MB100.00% 167086018864645871692761019448293152722
<fs-host-IP2> DC1 RAC2 Up Normal 1.29 MB 100.00% 26003787676682001822918611294472056316
<fs-host-IP3> DC2 RAC1 Down Normal 1.15 MB 100.00% 41007983964572150951275225962045789866
<fs-host-IP4> DC2 RAC2 Down Normal 1.16 MB 100.00% 53685600614278234503162023330018045221


The following nodetool commands remove <fs-host-IP3> and <fs-host-IP4> nodes from the ring:

java -cp libthrift-0.7.0.jar:cassandra-thrift-1.1.12.jar:commons-cli-1.1.jar:cassandra-all-1.1.12.jar org.apache.cassandra.tools.NodeCmd -h localhost -p 9192 removetoken 41007983964572150951275225962045789866
java -cp libthrift-0.7.0.jar:cassandra-thrift-1.1.12.jar:commons-cli-1.1.jar:cassandra-all-1.1.12.jar org.apache.cassandra.tools.NodeCmd -h localhost -p 9192 removetoken 53685600614278234503162023330018045221


After token removal, running nodetool ring should provide the following output:

<fs-host-IP1> DC1 RAC1 Up Normal 1.17 MB 100.00% 167086018864645871692761019448293152722
<fs-host-IP2> DC1 RAC2 Up Normal 1.29 MB 100.00% 26003787676682001822918611294472056316

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This page was last modified on July 24, 2018, at 05:14.