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Common Log Options

Configure the common log options in the same section as the ORS-specific log options.

log Section

This section must be called log.

For applications configured via a configuration file, changes to log options take effect after the application is restarted.

  • buffering
  • check-point
  • compatible-output-priority
  • expire
  • keep-startup-file
  • memory
  • memory-storage-size
  • message_format
  • messagefile
  • print-attributes
  • segment
  • spool
  • time_convert
  • time_format
  • verbose

Log Output Options

To configure log outputs, set log level options (all, alarm, standard, interaction, trace, and/or debug) to the desired types of log output (stdout, stderr, network, memory, and/or [filename], for log file output).

You can use:

  • One log level option to specify different log outputs.
  • One log output type for different log levels.
  • Several log output types simultaneously, to log events of the same or different log levels.

You must separate the log output types by a comma when you are configuring more than one output for the same log level.

If you direct log output to a file on the network drive, an application does not create a snapshot log file (with the extension *.snapshot.log) in case it terminates abnormally.

Directing log output to the console (by using the stdout or stderr settings) can affect application performance. Avoid using these log output settings in a production environment.

The log output options are activated according to the setting of the verbose configuration option.

  • all
  • alarm
  • standard
  • interaction
  • trace
  • debug

Log File Extensions

You can use the following file extensions to identify log files that an application creates for various types of output:  

  • .log—Assigned to log files when you configure output to a log file. For example, if you set standard = confservlog for Configuration Server, it prints log messages into a text file called confservlog.<time_stamp>.log.
  • .qsp—Assigned to temporary (spool) files when you configure output to the network but the network is temporarily unavailable. For example, if you set standard = network for Configuration Server, it prints log messages into a file called confserv.<time_stamp>.qsp during the time the network is not available.
  • .snapshot.log—Assigned to files that contain the output snapshot when you configure output to a log file. The file contains the last log messages that an application generates before it terminates abnormally. For example, if you set standard = confservlog for Configuration Server, it prints the last log message into a file called confserv.<time_stamp>.snapshot.log in case of failure.

Note: Provide *.snapshot.log files to Genesys Customer Care when reporting a problem.

  • .memory.log—Assigned to log files that contain the memory output snapshot when you configure output to memory and redirect the most recent memory output to a file. For example, if you set standard = memory and memory = confserv for Configuration Server, it prints the latest memory output to a file called confserv.<time_stamp>.memory.log.

 

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This page was last modified on July 6, 2015, at 09:36.